Catalyst Counseling, LLC provides holistic and strength based mental health counseling services in a school setting. Therapists promote optimal academic/school functioning, developmental assets, and overall health and wellness to help people live happier more fulfilling lives. Catalyst Counseling, LLC’s school based therapy program has the advantage of providing early detection and immediate intervention, accessible and convenient services, and effective collaboration and coordination.

Early Detection and Immediate Intervention

Approximately 1 in 5 youth have a serious mental health diagnosis (NIMH, 2010).  Around 2.2 million adolescents between the ages of 12 to 17  have reported major depression in the past year and around 60% of them did not receive treatment (SAMHSA, 2005a). Even more concerning, suicide is the third leading cause of death for youth ages 10 to 24 years old. This statistic translates into approximately 4600 lives lost each year (CDC, 2015).

The first signs of emotional distress are often detected in a school setting by teachers, administrators, counselors,  school psychologists, or truancy officers. Problems related to attendance, behavior, and credits often indicate underlying mental health issues. School personnel are more likely to refer students for mental health services when the services are offered within the school and they have an established working relationship with the mental health team.

Catalyst Counseling, LLC onsite therapists are easily accessible to students  to provide immediate intervention. Once students are established as clients, therapists have the advantage of providing on site crisis intervention, consultation, and team/family meetings.  Students are able to engage in coping skill practice and application in real life situations to promote teachable moments in peer and adult interactions.

Accessible and Convenient Services

Indeed, students spend  a significant amount of their time in school. Catalyst Counseling, LLC school based therapists recognize the importance of providing  full time accessibility and convenient treatment by having offices right within the school. Research suggests that students are substantially more likely to seek help when mental health services are available in their school (Slade, 2002). School based therapy also allows for more consistent services because it eliminates transportation and no show issues that often interfere with treatment effectiveness. Moreover, school based therapists are able to provide treatment to individuals that may not otherwise have access to services.

Effective Collaboration and Coordination

Catalyst Counseling, LLC therapists bridge the gap between students, families, community, and school professionals. Building strong relationships is at the forefront of school based practice to provide more effective advocacy for students and families within the school setting. Therapists provide education to school staff about mental health signs and symptoms, high risk warning signs, and when to make a referral. Therapists work closely with parents/guardians, teachers, administrators, counselors, school psychologists, and truancy officers on behavioral interventions, safety plans, 504 plans, and individualized education plans (IEPs) as well as attending multidisciplinary team meetings. Additionally, therapists make referrals to and collaborate with outside entities such as medical professionals and hospitals, community agencies, and juvenile court/probation officers.

 

References:

Any Disorder Among Children. (2010). In National Institute of Mental Health. Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/prevalence/any-disorder-among-children.shtml

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2005a). Depression among Adolescents. The NSDUH Report. Rockville, MD: Author.

Suicide Prevention. (2015). In Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Center for Injury Prevention and ControlDivision of Violence Prevention. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pub/youth_suicide.html

Slade, E. P. (2002). Effects of school-based mental health programs on mental health service use by adolescents at school   and in the community. Mental Health Service Research, 4, 151-166.